Maternal pregnancy-related hypertension and risk for hypertension in offspring later in life.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the association between maternal pregnancy-related hypertension and offspring hypertension later in life in a birth cohort from New England.

METHODS

Covariate and exposure data were collected between 1959 and 1966 through the Collaborative Perinatal Project. Follow-up information was obtained through the New England Family Study between 2001 and 2004, when study participants were between 34 and 44 years old. The study population consisted of 1,556 individuals. Participants who reported having hypertension diagnosed at least once were considered to have hypertension. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between maternal pregnancy-related hypertension and offspring hypertension later in life. Results were adjusted for sex, maternal race, maternal body mass index, maternal socioeconomic status, maternal diabetes, and twin pregnancy.

RESULTS

Maternal pregnancy-related hypertension was associated with an increased risk of being prescribed antihypertensives compared with never having hypertension diagnosed (from 8.8% to 17.4%; adjusted odds ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.00-3.55). The association was not attenuated after adjustment for birth weight or preterm delivery. After excluding offspring of women who reported hypertension during pregnancy only, this association increased to an adjusted odds ratio of 1.97 (95% confidence interval 1.04-3.72).

CONCLUSION

In a birth cohort from New England, maternal pregnancy-related hypertension was associated with hypertension in offspring later in life.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

II.

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