Impaired sodium-evoked paraventricular nucleus neuronal activation and blood pressure regulation in conscious Sprague–Dawley rats lacking central Gαi2 proteins

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Abstract

Aim:

We determined the role of brain Gαi2 proteins in mediating the neural and humoral responses of conscious male Sprague–Dawley rats to acute peripheral sodium challenge.

Methods:

Rats pre-treated (24-h) intracerebroventricularly with a targeted oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) (25 μg per 5 μL) to downregulate brain Gαi2 protein expression or a scrambled (SCR) control ODN were challenged with an acute sodium load (intravenous bolus 3 m NaCl; 0.14 mL per 100 g), and cardiovascular parameters were monitored for 120 min. In additional groups, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) Fos immunoreactivity was examined at baseline, 40, and 100 min post-sodium challenge.

Results:

In response to intravenous hypertonic saline (HS), no difference was observed in peak change in mean arterial pressure between groups. In SCR ODN pre-treated rats, arterial pressure returned to baseline by 100 min, while it remained elevated in Gαi2 ODN pre-treated rats (P < 0.05). No difference between groups was observed in sodium-evoked increases in Fos-positive magnocellular neurons or vasopressin release. V1a receptor antagonism failed to block the prolonged elevation of arterial pressure in Gαi2 ODN pre-treated rats. A significantly greater number of Fos-positive ventrolateral parvocellular, lateral parvocellular, and medial parvocellular neurons were observed in SCR vs. Gαi2 ODN pre-treated rats at 40 and 100 min post-HS challenge (P < 0.05). In SCR, but not Gαi2 ODN pre-treated rats, HS evoked suppression of plasma norepinephrine (P < 0.05).

Conclusion:

This highlights Gαi2 protein signal transduction as a novel central mechanism acting to differentially influence PVN parvocellular neuronal activation, sympathetic outflow, and arterial pressure in response to acute HS, independently of actions on magnocellular neurons and vasopressin release.

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