Bioinspired Nanoparticulate Medical Glues for Minimally Invasive Tissue Repair


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Abstract

Delivery of tissue glues through small-bore needles or trocars is critical for sealing holes, affixing medical devices, or attaching tissues together during minimally invasive surgeries. Inspired by the granule-packaged glue delivery system of sandcastle worms, a nanoparticulate formulation of a viscous hydrophobic light-activated adhesive based on poly(glycerol sebacate)-acrylate is developed. Negatively charged alginate is used to stabilize the nanoparticulate surface to significantly reduce its viscosity and to maximize injectability through small-bore needles. The nanoparticulate glues can be concentrated to ≈30 w/v% dispersions in water that remain localized following injection. With the trigger of a positively charged polymer (e.g., protamine), the nanoparticulate glues can quickly assemble into a viscous glue that exhibits rheological, mechanical, and adhesive properties resembling the native poly(glycerol sebacate)-acrylate based glues. This platform should be useful to enable the delivery of viscous glues to augment or replace sutures and staples during minimally invasive procedures.

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