Clinical safety of HIV lipopeptides used as vaccines in healthy volunteers and HIV-infected adults

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Abstract

Background:

HIV-1 lipopeptides have been developed by the French National Agency for AIDS Research (ANRS) for use as candidate vaccine against HIV since 1994. Between 1996 and 2005, four different lipopeptide constructs were tested alone or in combination with recombinant canarypox HIV vaccines in 10 trials conducted in France. The aim of this study was to review clinical safety of HIV lipopeptides.

Methods:

A meta-analysis based on individual subject data examined clinical safety data collected in eight preventive trials and two therapeutic trials enrolling 200 HIV-1-uninfected healthy volunteers and 48 HIV-1-infected patients.

Results:

Of 248 trial participants, eight (3.2%) did not complete follow-up: seven among the 200 healthy volunteers, and one among the 48 HIV-1 infected patients. During the 354 person-years of follow-up, 860 lipopeptides injections were administered. Local reactions were common. However, in trials where lipopeptides were tested without adjuvant and appropriate diluents, none of the vaccinees experienced severe local response. Systemic reactions were generally mild and transient. No grade 4 reaction was reported; 18 subjects experienced grade 3 systemic events related to the vaccination, mainly asthenia, fever, headache and arthralgia. Multivariate analysis showed that female sex, number of injections and diluent (more reactions in 5% glucose alone than in combination with Tris-HCl buffer) significantly increased systemic reactions related to the vaccination.

Conclusion:

These data demonstrate that reactogenicity and systemic safety of HIV lipopeptides vaccine are acceptable both in healthy volunteers and HIV-infected adults.

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