Survival of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients with and without HIV infection in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy


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Abstract

Objective:To investigate the survival outcomes for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected vs. uninfected patients from the same integrated healthcare system, and to identify prognostic factors for HIV-related NHL in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy.Design:A cohort study.Methods:Incident NHL diagnosed between 1996 and 2005 were identified from members of Kaiser Permanente California Health Plans. Two-year all-cause and lymphoma-specific mortality by HIV status were examined using multivariable Poisson regression. Among HIV-infected patients, prognostic factors of demographics, lymphoma, and HIV-related characteristics for the same outcomes were also examined.Results:A total of 259 HIV-infected and 8230 HIV-uninfected incident NHL patients were evaluated. Fifty-nine percent of HIV-infected patients died within 2 years after NHL diagnosis as compared with 30% of HIV-uninfected patients. HIV status was independently associated with a doubling of 2-year all-cause mortality (relative risk = 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.7–2.3). This elevated mortality risk for HIV-infected patients was similar for all race groups, lymphoma stages, and histologic subtypes. HIV-infected patients with CD4 cell count below 200 cells/μl, prior AIDS-defining illness, or both were also at increased risk for lymphoma-specific mortality as compared with HIV-uninfected patients. Among HIV-infected NHL patients, significant prognostic factors for overall mortality included prior AIDS-defining illness and Burkitt's subtype.Conclusion:HIV-infected patients with NHL in the combined antiretroviral therapy era continue to endure substantially higher mortality compared with HIV-uninfected patients with NHL. Better management and therapeutic approaches to extend survival time for HIV-related NHL are needed.

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