Positron Emission Tomography Diagnosis Of Pulmonary Metastases In Osteogenic Sarcoma

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging technique that can produce high-quality tomographic images reflective of the metabolic characteristics of imaged tissue. Among the many positron-emitting tracers utilized in conjunction with PET is [18F]fluoride ion; it is actively taken up in bone in proportion to bone metabolic activity, analogous to standard nuclear medicine bone scanning agents such as technetium methylenediphosphonate ([99mTc]MDP). Whole-body imaging with PET and [18F]fluoride ion generates tomographic images that are useful in mapping patterns of bone metabolism, as well as identifying extraosseous site of bone formation or calcification. We report the case of a patient with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, metastatic osteogenic sarcoma, and a breast mass, who presented with pulmonary nodules, in whom [18F] flouride ion/PET imaging was useful in confirming the nature of the pulmonary nodules.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles