Clinical predictors ofEnterobacterbacteremia among patients admitted to the ED

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objectives

This study was performed to evaluate clinical features of community-onset Enterobacter bacteremia and determine the risk factors for Enterobacter bacteremia among patients admitted to the emergency department.

Methods

A post hoc analysis of a nationwide surveillance database of bacteremia was performed. A total of 53 patients with community-onset Enterobacter bacteremia were compared with 882 patients with Escherichia coli bacteremia.

Results

As for the underlying disease, solid tumor was more likely common in Enterobacter bacteremia than in E coli bacteremia (39.6% [21/53] vs 19.7% [174/882], P < .001). Neutropenia, indwelling urinary catheter, and tube insertion were significantly more common in Enterobacter bacteremia than in E coli bacteremia (all Ps < .05). As for the site of infection, lung and abdomen were more likely common in Enterobacter bacteremia than in E coli bacteremia, whereas urinary tract was less likely frequent in Enterobacter bacteremia than in E coli bacteremia (all Ps < .05). In the multivariate analysis, pneumonia, tube insertion, solid tumor, and health care-associated infection were found to be significantly associated with Enterobacter bacteremia (all Ps < .05).

Conclusions

Enterobacter species were important pathogens among community-onset gram-negative bacteremia, in association with health care-associated infections. Pneumonia, tube insertion, solid tumor, and health care-associated infections were found to be significantly associated with Enterobacter bacteremia.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles