The effects of air pollution and weather conditions on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction

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Abstract

Objective:

In this retrospective study, we investigated the association between air pollution and weather conditions with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the city of Kutahya.

Methods:

A total of 402 patients who were admitted with acute ST segment elevation MI and non–ST segment elevation MI were included in the study in 1 year. Daily maximum, minimum, and mean ambient temperature and mean barometric pressure data were obtained from the Kutahya Meteorology Department. Daily air pollution data were obtained from the Web site of National Air Quality Observation Network (http://www.havaizleme.gov.tr).

Results:

Increase in ambient air temperature in the day of MI and 2 days before the day of MI according to their control days was correlated with increase in number of MI cases. When we grouped the patients according to ages as 30-54, 55-65, and > 65 years, we found that there was a relation between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and the occurrence of AMI for the age group of 30-54 for the same day (D0) (P < .017). The number of AMIs was the lowest in fall season, whereas the number of AMIs was the highest in winter season.

Conclusion:

There was no statistically significant association between the particulates with diameter b = 10 μm, SO2 concentrations, air pressure, and the risk of AMI, but there was statistically significant relation between occurrence of MI and SO2 for the patients under age of 55 years. The number of AMIs was the lowest in fall season, whereas the number of AMIs was the highest in winter season.

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