Resuscitation quality of rotating chest compression providers at one-minute vs. two-minute intervals: A mannequin study

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Abstract

Objective:

The aim of this randomized cross-over study was to compare one-minute and two-minute continuous chest compressions in terms of chest compression only CPR quality metrics on a mannequin model in the ED.

Materials and methods:

Thirty-six emergency medicine residents participated in this study. In the 1-minute group, there was no statistically significant difference in the mean compression rate (p = 0.83), mean compression depth (p = 0.61), good compressions (p = 0.31), the percentage of complete release (p = 0.07), adequate compression depth (p = 0.11) or the percentage of good rate (p = 51) over the four-minute time period. Only flow time was statistically significant among the 1-minute intervals (p < 0.001). In the 2-minute group, the mean compression depth (p = 0.19), good compression (p = 0.92), the percentage of complete release (p = 0.28), adequate compression depth (p = 0.96), and the percentage of good rate (p = 0.09) were not statistically significant over time. In this group, the number of compressions (248 ± 31 vs 253 ± 33, p = 0.01) and mean compression rates (123 ± 15 vs 126 ± 17, p = 0.01) and flow time (p = 0.001) were statistically significant along the two-minute intervals. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean number of chest compressions per minute, mean chest compression depth, the percentage of good compressions, complete release, adequate chest compression depth and percentage of good compression between the 1-minute and 2-minute groups.

Conclusion:

There was no statistically significant difference in the quality metrics of chest compressions between 1- and 2-minute chest compression only groups.

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