CPR feedback/prompt device improves the quality of hands-only CPR performed in manikin by laypersons following the 2015 AHA guidelines

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Abstract

Purpose:

We investigated the effects of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback/prompt device on the quality of chest compression (CC) during hands-only CPR following the 2015 AHA guidelines.

Methods:

A total of 124 laypersons were randomly assigned into three groups. The first (n = 42) followed the 2010 guidelines, the second (n = 42) followed the 2015 guidelines with no feedback/prompt device, the third (n = 40) followed the 2015 guidelines with a feedback/prompt device (2015F). Participants underwent manual CPR training and took a written basic life support examination, then required to perform 2 min of hands-only CPR monitored by a CPR feedback/prompt device. The quality of CPR was quantified as the percentage of correct CCs (mean CC depth and rate, complete recoil and chest compression fraction (CCF)) per 20 s, as recorded by the CPR feedback/prompt device.

Results:

Significantly higher correct ratios of CC, CC depth, and rate were achieved in the 2010 group in each minute vs the 2015 group. The greater mean CC depth and rate were observed in the 2015F group vs the 2015 group. The correct ratio of CC was significantly higher in the 2015F group vs the 2015 group. CCF was also significantly higher in the 2015F group vs the 2015 group in the last 20 s of CPR.

Conclusions:

It is difficult for a large percentage of laypersons to achieve the targets of CC depth and rate following the 2015 AHA guidelines. CPR feedback/prompt devices significantly improve the quality of hands-only CPR performance by laypersons following the standards of the 2015 AHA guidelines.

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