High Serum sTREM-1 Correlates With Myocardial Dysfunction and Predicts Prognosis in Septic Patients

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Abstract

Objective:

This study aimed to evaluate the predictive and prognostic value of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in patients with myocardial dysfunction induced by severe sepsis and septic shock.

Materials and Methods:

A total of 84 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock were enrolled between May 2013 and December 2014.The patients were monitored by pulse indicator continuous cardiac output system and divided into myocardial depression group (cardiac function index [CFI] < 4.1/minute, n = 37) and nonmyocardial depression group (CFI ≥ 4.1/minute, n = 47). Additionally, the patients were divided into survival group (n = 40) and nonsurvival group (n = 44) based on 28-day mortality. Hemodynamic parameters and serum sTREM-1, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels were collected on days 1, 3 and 5 after admission to intensive care unit.

Results:

(1) The serum values of sTREM-1, BNP and cTnI in myocardial depression group were higher than those in nonmyocardial depression group (P < 0.01); and CFI, cardiac index, stroke volume, global ejection fraction and left ventricular contractility index (dpmax) in myocardial depression group were lower than those in nonmyocardial depression group on day 1 (P < 0.05); (2) serum sTREM-1 negatively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction, CFI, cardiac index, global ejection fraction and dpmax, and it positively correlated with BNP and cTnI (P < 0.01); (3) the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for sTREM-1 in the prediction of myocardial depression was 0.671 with a sensitivity of 83.8% and a specificity of 46.8% when cutoff point was 174.5 ng/mL, the power of predicting septic depression for sTREM-1 was lower than that of BNP; logistic regression analysis showed that serum sTREM-1 was not an independent predictor of septic myocardial depression; the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.773 for sTREM-1 in predicting outcome with a sensitivity of 86.4% and a specificity of 80% when cutoff point was 182.3 ng/mL, the power of predicting prognosis for sTREM-1 was superior to those of BNP and cTnI; (4) there was a decrease trend for sTREM-1 levels and an increasing trend for CFI in the survival group (P < 0.05).

Conclusions:

Myocardial dysfunction is common in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock and high serum levels of sTREM-1 correlates with myocardial dysfunction to some extent but is not an independent predictor, which more importantly showed prognostic value for septic shock outcome.

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