Is the Risk of Perinatal Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Increased by the Intrapartum Use of Spiral Electrodes or Fetal Scalp pH Sampling?

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to determine whether the intrapartum use of fetal scalp electrodes or fetal scalp pH sampling increases the rate of perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus.

STUDY DESIGN

The rate of perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in 31 monitored pregnancies was determined, and those pregnancies were compared with a control group of 117 pregnancies.

RESULTS

The monitored group was comparable to the control group with respect to maternal age, race, human immunodeficiency virus risk behavior, CD4+ cell count, p24 antigen status, and stage of human immunodeficiency virus disease. The mean gestational age at delivery and the mean birth weight were similar in the monitored group and the control group. The perinatal transmission rate for the monitored group (29.0%) was not statistically different from that of the control group (25.6%).

CONCLUSIONS

If confirmed by larger studies, our findings suggest that the intrapartum use of fetal scalp electrodes or fetal scalp pH sampling does not appear to increase the perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. (AM J OBSTET GYNECOL 1994;170:740-3.)

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