Maternal serum thromboxane B2 concentrations do not predict improved outcomes in high-risk pregnancies in a low-dose aspirin trial

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the study was too determine whether, in a low-dose aspirin trial in high-risk pregnancies, a decrease in maternal serum thromboxane B2 level predicted improved pregnancy outcomes.

STUDY DESIGN

This multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial included 2539 women, 1010 of whom had sufficient serum samples at enrollment and at 24 to 28 weeks' gestation, 34 to 38 weeks' gestation, or both to assess longitudinal changes in thromboxane B2 level and their effects on pregnancy outcomes. Women were randomly assigned between 13 and 26 weeks' gestation to receive daily aspirin (60 mg) or placebo.

RESULTS

Overall and in all subgroups women assigned to receive aspirin had markedly lower maternal thromboxane B2 concentration values than did those assigned to receive a placebo (P = .0001). Changes in thromboxane levels were not, however, correlated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Women with >or=to50% reduction in maternal serum thromboxane B2 concentrations from baseline had occurrences of preeclampsia (P = .922), preterm birth (P = .375), small for gestational age neonates (P = .938), and grade III or IV intra-ventricular hemorrhage (P = 1.000) similar to those of women who had <50% reduction. Similar results were found for women with thromboxane B2 level decreases of <15 versus >15 ng/mL and women with thromboxane B2 level decreases to <10 versus >or=to10, <5 versus >or=to5, and <1 versus >or=to1 ng/mL. Maternal thromboxane B2 concentrations at enrollment were also not predictive of adverse outcomes.

CONCLUSION

Neither maternal serum thromboxane B2 concentrations at enrollment nor their subsequent reduction were predictive of adverse pregnancy outcomes in a low-dose aspirin trial. (Am J Obstet Gynecol 1998;179:1193-9.)

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