Effects of female genital mutilation/cutting on the sexual function of Sudanese women: a cross-sectional study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is a cultural practice that involves several types of removal or other injury to the external female genitalia for nonmedical reasons. Although much international research has focused on the health consequences of the practice, little is known about sexual functioning among women with various types of FGM/C.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the impact of FGM/C on the sexual functioning of Sudanese women.

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a cross-sectional study conducted at Doctor Erfan and Bagedo Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Eligible women completed a survey and a clinical examination, which documented and verified women's type of FGM/C. The main outcome measure was female sexual function, as assessed by the Arabic Female Sexual Function Index.

RESULTS:

A total of 107 eligible women completed the survey and the gynecological examination, which revealed that 39% of the women had FGM/C Type I, 25% had Type II, and 36% had Type III. Reliability of self-report of the type of FGM/C was low, with underreporting of the extent of the procedure. The results showed that 92.5% of the women scored lower than the Arabic Female Sexual Function Index cut-off point for sexual dysfunction. The multivariable regression analyses showed that sexual dysfunction was significantly greater with more extensive type of FGM/C, across all sexual function domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain) and overall.

CONCLUSION:

The study documents that a substantial proportion of women subjected to FGM/C experience sexual dysfunction. It shows that the anatomical extent of FGM/C is related to the severity of sexual dysfunction.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles