The Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma, Part II: Reparative Adaptational Impacts

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Abstract

The impacts of the Holocaust on children of survivors have been widely investigated. However, consensus is limited, and no validated measures have been tailored with or to them. We aimed to develop and validate a scale that measures these specific impacts (Part II of the Danieli Inventory of Multigenerational Legacies of Trauma). We studied 484 adult children of survivors who participated in a cross-sectional web-based survey in English or Hebrew; of these, 191 participated in a clinical interview. Exploratory factor analyses of 58 items to reduce and refine the measure yielded a 36-item scale, Reparative Adaptational Impacts, that had excellent internal consistency (α = .91) and congruence between English and Hebrew versions (φ ≥ .95). Associations between impacts and SCID-based diagnoses of major depressive episode, posttraumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were moderate to strong (ds = 0.48–0.89). Strong associations also emerged between severity of offspring’s reparative adaptational impacts and intensity of their parents’ posttrauma adaptational styles (Multiple R = .72), with intensity of victim style, especially the mother’s, having the strongest effect (β = .31–.33). Having both research and clinical relevance for assessing Holocaust survivors’ offspring, future studies might investigate the scale’s generalizability to other populations affected by mass trauma.

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