Longitudinal Effects of Universal Preventive Intervention on Prescription Drug Misuse: Three Randomized Controlled Trials With Late Adolescents and Young Adults

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Abstract

Objectives

We examined long-term prescription drug misuse outcomes in 3 randomized controlled trials evaluating brief universal preventive interventions conducted during middle school.

Methods

In 3 studies, we tested the Iowa Strengthening Families Program (ISFP); evaluated a revised ISFP, the Strengthening Families Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 plus the school-based Life Skills Training (SFP 10-14 + LST); and examined the SFP 10-14 plus 1 of 3 school-based interventions. Self-reported outcomes were prescription opioid misuse (POM) and lifetime prescription drug misuse overall (PDMO).

Results

In study 1, ISFP showed significant effects on POM and PDMO, relative reduction rates (RRRs; age 25 years) of 65%, and comparable benefits for higher- and lower-risk subgroups. In study 2, SFP 10-14 + LST showed significant or marginally significant effects on POM and PDMO across all ages (21, 22, and 25 years); higher-risk participants showed stronger effects (RRRs = 32%-79%). In study 3, we found significant results for POM and PDMO (12th grade RRRs = 20%-21%); higher-risk and lower-risk participants showed comparable outcomes.

Conclusions

Brief universal interventions have potential for public health impact by reducing prescription drug misuse among adolescents and young adults.

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