Community-Based Rehabilitation to Improve Stroke Survivors’ Rehabilitation Participation and Functional Recovery


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Abstract

ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based rehabilitation appropriate technique (CRAT) intervention program in increasing rehabilitation participation and improving functional recovery of stroke survivors.DesignThis study followed a quasi-experimental design. In each of 5 centers servicing approximately 50,000 individuals, 2 communities were designated as either the intervention or control community. A CRAT intervention program, including 2-year rehabilitation education and 3-month CRAT treatment, was regularly implemented in the intervention communities, whereas there was no special intervention in the control community. Two sampling surveys, at baseline and after intervention, were administered to evaluate the rehabilitation activity undertaken. In intervention communities, stroke survivor’s motor function, daily activity, and social activity were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment, using the Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment, Barthel index, and Social Functional Activities Questionnaire.ResultsThe proportion of individuals participating in rehabilitation-related activity was increased significantly (P < 0.05) in intervention communities, as compared with control communities. In intervention communities, the patients’ Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment, Barthel index, and Social Functional Activities Questionnaire scores were significantly improved after rehabilitation (P < 0.05) across all ages and disease courses, except for the FAQ scores in patients younger than 50 years (P > 0.05).ConclusionsCommunity-based rehabilitation appropriate technique increases rehabilitation participation rates and enhances motor function, daily activity, and social activity of stroke survivors.

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