High-Dose Vitamin D3 during Tuberculosis Treatment in Mongolia. A Randomized Controlled Trial

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Rationale:

Existing trials of adjunctive vitamin D in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) are variously limited by small sample sizes, inadequate dosing regimens, and high baseline vitamin D status among participants. Comprehensive analyses of the effects of genetic variation in the vitamin D pathway on response to vitamin D supplementation are lacking.

Objectives:

To determine the effect of high-dose vitamin D3 on response to antimicrobial therapy for PTB and to evaluate the influence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vitamin D pathway genes on response to adjunctive vitamin D3.

Methods:

We conducted a clinical trial in 390 adults with PTB in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, who were randomized to receive four biweekly doses of 3.5 mg (140,000 IU) vitamin D3 (n = 190) or placebo (n = 200) during intensive-phase antituberculosis treatment.

Measurements and Main Results:

The intervention elevated 8-week serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (154.5 nmol/L vs. 15.2 nmol/L in active vs. placebo arms, respectively; 95% confidence interval for difference, 125.9-154.7 nmol/L; P < 0.001) but did not influence time to sputum culture conversion overall (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.36; P = 0.48). Adjunctive vitamin D3 accelerated sputum culture conversion in patients with one or more minor alleles for SNPs in genes encoding the vitamin D receptor (rs4334089, rs11568820) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1: rs4646536) (adjusted hazard ratio ≥ 1.47; P for interaction ≤ 0.02).

Conclusions:

Vitamin D3 did not influence time to sputum culture conversion in the study population overall. Effects of the intervention were modified by SNPs in VDR and CYP27B1.

Conclusions:

Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01657656).

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles