Sports Activity After Reconstruction of Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus With Autologous Spongiosa Grafts and Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

For the treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus (OCLTs), autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a safe 1-step procedure with good clinical and radiological results. However, data regarding postoperative sports activity after AMIC are limited.

Purpose:

To identify significant factors influencing the rate of postoperative sports and recreational activities.

Study Design:

Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods:

The sports and recreational activities of 60 patients (mean age, 34.9 ± 11.5 years) undergoing the AMIC procedure were retrospectively analyzed at a mean of 46.9 ± 17.8 months (range, 24.5-87.0 months) postoperatively. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain score, Tegner activity scale score, activity rating scale (ARS) score, and satisfaction with surgery outcomes were assessed.

Results:

Corrective calcaneal osteotomy was performed in 38 of 60 (63.3%) patients. Ligament repair was performed in 41 of 60 (68.3%) patients. The mean VAS score improved significantly from 6.9 ± 1.6 points (range, 5-10 points) preoperatively to 2.3 ± 1.9 points (range, 0-6 points) at latest follow-up (P < .001). No significant change in the mean Tegner activity scale score (3.3 ± 2.0 preoperatively to 3.4 ± 2.2 postoperatively; P = .526) and the mean ARS score (2.6 ± 4.3 preoperatively to 2.3 ± 3.4 postoperatively; P = .874) was noted. The percentage of patients involved in sports activity before the onset of symptoms became significantly lower at the time of surgery (from 95.0% to 53.3%; P < .001); no significant difference was noted postoperatively (from 53.3% to 58.3%; P = .663). No significant difference of the weekly sports frequency and the duration of sports activity was found postoperatively.

Conclusion:

Patients undergoing AMIC repair of an OCLT participate at a similar low postoperative sports and recreational activity level compared with the preoperative level.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles