Carcinoma of the Ampulla of Vater: Comparative Histologic/Immunohistochemical Classification and Follow-up

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Abstract

Abstract:

A broad histomorphologic spectrum of ampullary carcinomas of Vater make a reproducible histologic classification difficult. Using cytokeratin immunohistochemistry, we present a new classification of ampullary carcinomas and analyze their clinical significance. Fifty-five invasive carcinomas of Vater’s ampulla were histologically classified into pancreaticobiliary, intestinal, and other types. Serial sections of all carcinoma specimens were additionally stained with antibodies to cytokeratins (CK7, CK20), apomucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC), CEA, CA19-9, Ki67, and p53. Follow-up of patients from 4 months to 22 years after surgery (mean interval, 51.6 months) was evaluated. Most carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater were of immunohistochemically pancreaticobiliary type (iPT, CK7+, CK20−; 54.5%) or intestinal type (immunohistochemically intestinal type [iIT], CK7−, CK20+; 23.6%). Some carcinomas of immunohistochemically “other” type (iOT both CK7+ and CK20+ or CK7− and CK20−; 21.8%) had precursor lesions of iIT or iPT. Carcinomas positive for MUC2 or CEA were associated with iIT (MUC2, P < 0.001; CEA, P = 0.003), whereas MUC5AC-positive carcinomas were related to iPT (P = 0.005). Our classification based on cytokeratin-immunohistochemistry correlated well with the histologic classification according to published criteria (κ-coefficient = 0.398; P < 0.001). Furthermore, histologically unusual types could be histogenetically related to pancreaticobiliary duct mucosa or intestinal mucosa. Therefore, all 4 signet-ring cell carcinomas were iIT carcinomas. Thus, cytokeratin immunohistochemistry allows a reproducible, histogenetically based categorization of ampullary carcinomas. However, neither histopathologic nor immunohistochemical subgroups significantly correlated with clinical outcome in our German collective. The overall survival was significantly shorter in males (P = 0.032) and patients with positive nodal stage (N1 < N0; P = 0.0025).

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