Preliminary Experience with Amlodipine in the Pediatric Population

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

The authors retrospectively examined their experience with amlodipine in the treatment of hypertension in 32 pediatric-aged patients, ranging in age from 4 to 26 years, with blood pressure (BP) readings greater than the 90th percentile for age. Amlodipine was used as the sole therapy in 9 patients and with other antihypertensive therapy in 23 patients. Additional antihypertensive drugs used in combination with amlodipine included β-adrenergic antagonists, ACE inhibitors, and diuretics. The starting dose of amlodipine was 0.13±0.09 mg/kg/d. The dose was increased in 20 of 32 patients to 0.23±0.13 mg/kg/d. Amlodipine was administered once daily to 26 patients and twice daily to 6 patients. After therapy with amlodipine was initiated, the systolic BP decreased from 141±15 to 132±9 mm Hg (P=0.01) and the diastolic BP decreased from 84±16 to 77±8 mmHg (P=0,03). There were a total of 2145 follow-up BP readings. The follow-up systolic BP was lower than the initial BP prior to starting amlodipine 59% of the time and the diastolic BP was lower than the initial BP 61% of the time. The follow-up systolic BP was lower than the 90th percentile predicted for age 33% of the time after starting amlodipine and the diastolic BF was lower than the 90th percentile for age 52% of the time. Adverse effects were noted in 4 of the 32 patients (12.5%). These included fatigue (n=2), dizziness (n=1), and ankle edema (n=1). Amlodipine therapy was discontinued in only 1 patient (the patient with ankle edema). Given its efficacy, the low incidence of adverse effects, and availability as a suspension, amlodipine is an effective agent for the treatment of hypertension in the pediatric-aged patient.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles