Small intestinal cancer in England & Wales and Scotland: time trends in incidence, mortality and survival

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Abstract

Background

Time trends in mortality from small intestinal cancer have not been studied for the 1990s.

Objective

To examine secular trends in incidence of, mortality from, and survival from, small intestinal cancer in England & Wales and Scotland from 1975 to 2002, considering also histological type (incidence), subsite (incidence) and indices of social deprivation (incidence and survival).

Methods

Data were extracted from the Scottish Cancer Registry database and the General Register Office for Scotland, and from the National Cancer Intelligence Centre at the Office for National Statistics for England & Wales.

Results

Incidence rates for small intestinal cancer increased for both England & Wales and Scotland over the study period. They were highest among older individuals and generally greater for males than for females. Despite the increase in incidence rates, mortality rates from small intestinal tumours tended to remain stable over the study period, and the general trend was towards increasing survival. Indices of social deprivation were not obviously related to the incidence of small intestinal cancer and did not influence survival.

Conclusions

Incidence rates for small intestinal cancer for both England & Wales and Scotland increased in the last quarter of the 20th century, but survival rates improved and mortality rates declined.

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