The relationship between maternal parenting style, female adolescent decision making, and contraceptive use


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Abstract

Purpose:To examine the relationship between maternal parenting style, female adolescent decision making, and contraceptive behavior in multiethnic, 14- to 17-year-old Hawaii residents.Data sources:This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey design using a convenience sample of 112 female adolescents 14–17 years of age who came for health care from four clinics on the island of Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii. Along with a brief demographic questionnaire, maternal parenting style was measured by the Parental Control Scale, decision making was measured by the Flinders Adolescent Decision Making Questionnaire, and sexual activity and contraception use was measured by a non-normed Sexual History and Contraceptive Use Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and correlations were used to analyze associations and correlations between age, maternal parenting style, decision self-esteem, decision coping (vigilant and maladaptive), and contraceptive use for sexually active female adolescents.Conclusions:No significant associations or correlations were found between age, maternal parenting style, decision self-esteem, decision coping (vigilant and maladaptive), and contraceptive use. There were significant positive correlations (p < .05) between maternal parenting style, age, and decision coping-complacency, suggesting that maternal parenting styles are more controlling and that decision coping-complacency increases as the adolescent ages, leading the adolescents to take a less active role in decision making.

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