Sleep duration, general and abdominal obesity, and weight change among the older adult population of Spain1-4

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Abstract

Background:

Short sleep duration is associated with obesity and weight gain among children and young adults. However, there are few studies on the elderly, with conflicting results.

Objective:

We examined the association of habitual sleep duration with obesity and weight change among the population aged ≥60 y in Spain.

Design:

This prospective study was conducted from 2001 to 2003 on 3576 persons whose habitual sleep duration was self-reported in 2001. The outcomes were obesity [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) ≥30], severe obesity (BMI ≥35), and abdominal obesity (waist circumference >102 cm in men and >88 cm in women) in 2001 and weight gain ≥5 kg in the period 2001-2003.

Results:

Compared with subjects who slept 7 h, subjects who slept ≤5 h had a greater frequency of obesity [odds ratio (OR): 1.33; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.77] and severe obesity (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.31, 3.32). In addition, sleeping 8 h was associated with obesity (OR: 1.39; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.75) and severe obesity (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.73). Similarly, subjects sleeping 9 h were more likely to have severe obesity (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.47). Among women, weight gain ≥5 kg was more frequent among subjects sleeping ≤5 h (OR: 3.41; 95% CI: 1.34, 8.69), 8 h (OR: 3.03; 95% CI: 1.29, 7.12), and 9 h (OR: 3.77; 95% CI: 1.55, 9.17). No association was observed between sleep duration and abdominal obesity.

Conclusions:

Among older adults, sleeping ≤5 h and sleeping 8 or 9 h was associated with obesity and with short-term weight gain in women.

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