THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR IN THE TREATMENT OF WAR WOUNDS AND THE MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR IN CIVILIAN SURGERY—THE GOOD SURGEON
THE PROBLEM OF THE “SLIGHTLY WOUNDED” IN MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PRACTICE
WHAT WOULD BE THE BENEFIT TO THE CIVILIAN SURGEON IN THE EXPERIENCE GAINED BY OUR MILITARY SURGEONS IN THE RECENT WORLD WAR
RÖNTGENOGRAPHY OF THE BRAIN AFTER THE INJECTION OF AIR INTO THE SPINAL CANAL
FRACTURE OF THE SKULL WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS NEUROLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS
GUNSHOT FRACTURES OF THE HUMERUS TREATED BY SUSPENSION AND TRACTION
FRACTURES OF THE LOWER THIRD OF THE FEMUR
THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE WAR TO THE SURGERY OF THE KNEE-JOINT
POCKETING OPERATIONS AND OTHER SKIN AND FAT TRANSFERS
THE BARREL-STAVE SPLINT IN FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE
FOREIGN BODIES ARRESTED IN THE DUODENUM
“ENURESIS” OF ADULTS; HYPERTONIC BLADDER
THE ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF AN EVACUATION HOSPITAL
THE THREE-TABLE MILITARY OPERATING ROOM A PLAN APPLICABLE TO CIVIL HOSPITALS
COLLECTED PAPERS OF THE MAYO CLINIC
SIMPLE BANDAGE FOR FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE