Transient left anterior and septal fascicular blocks after self-expandable percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation

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Abstract

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is indicated in severe symptomatic aortic stenosis, when there is intermediate-high surgical risk, or a condition considered inoperable, as in the case of “porcelain aorta” that could turn clamping or cannulation of the ascending aorta hazardous in open-heart surgery. Among the complications of this less invasive procedure, intraventricular conduction disorders subsequent to the procedure stand out. TAVI causes worsening of intraventricular dromotropic disorders in more than 75% of the cases, with the presence of preexisting right bundle branch block and first-degree atrioventricular block, deep prosthesis implant, male gender, size of the aortic annulus smaller than the prosthesis, and porcelain aorta being predictive of requirement for permanent pacemaker implant.

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