THE PRESENT SITUATION AND FUTURE OF THE PROVISION OF CANCER-RELATED INFORMATION AND SUPPORT IN JAPAN: HOW WE PROVIDE RELIABLE INFORMATION AND SUPPORT POPULATIONS AT RISK

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

It has been 5 years since the Cancer Information & Support Center (CISC) was established in response to demand for equal access to cancer-related information. The management of the CISC support system requires several functions like individual consultation, organizational and community consultation, information and risk management, and public relations activities. I will describe the current state of the CISC through the results of the annual Cancer Designated Care Hospitals (CDCHs) survey and provide an insight on how we can facilitate the CISC and support the populations at risk in the future. The number of cancer information and support specialists (CISS) who have completed the 5-day basic training program was 1405 by the end of 2011, and an average of two or three specialists has worked at each of the 388 CDCHs. The number of consultations is gradually increasing, and about 40% of the CDCHs consult more than five cases a day. However, out-of-hospital consultations remain low (<20%). The purpose of establishing the CISC was to consult people not only in the hospital but also outside of the hospital. The current survey shows that the CISC is not serving the community people well, and this reinforces the inactive state of the CISC in the mind of the general public. However, several CISCs are very active in terms of increasing number of consultations, particularly in out-of-hospital care. The analysis indicates that it is important that not only individual CISS skills but also a variety of systematic factors with regard to CDCH contribute to the active state of CISC. As the CISCs and CDCHs are located in the local community, we now have to rethink about how we can satisfactorily provide cancer-related information and support in the community. Furthermore, we have to strengthen the relationships and networks inside and outside the hospitals, apply a comprehensive approach to help people at risk who seek reliable cancer-related information, and provide appropriate support in the community.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles