ERIBULIN FOR THE TREATMENT OF A PATIENT WITH TRIPLE NEGATIVE METASTATIC BREAST CANCER -A CASE REPORT-

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Abstract

Background

Eribulin is an anti-cancer drug with a novel mode of action that inhibits microtubule dynamics. Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive type of breast cancer that is clinically defined as lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors, as well as being HER-2 negative, and carries a worse prognosis than other types of breast cancer. We report on an effective treatment with eribulin in a case with refractory triple negative metastatic breast cancer.

Case

A 79-year-old woman had undergone total mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy for stage II right breast cancer in August 2003. Immunohistochemical examinations of the tumor cells showed negative results for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER-2 (score: 0). After recurrence of multiple bone metastasis in November 2006, she received chemotherapy including FEC (epirubicine, cyclophosphamide and 5-fluoropyrimidine) protocol, TS-1, or paclitaxel. Despite these treatments, clinical examination, serological data and CT findings revealed the evolution of the disease with bone and liver metastasis. She was referred to our department and was treated with eribulin as a novel therapeutic agent (1.1–1.2 mg/m2, 2 weeks on, 1 week off). After 6 courses of administrations, a CT scan showed a marked improvement of liver metastasis. The level of cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3), which was initially 922.8 U/ml (normal value of <31), lowered to 198.9 U/ml and the elevated CEA was normalized. No sever non-hematological adverse event above grade 3 was noted (peripheral neuropathy: grade 1, alopecia grade 1). Grade 3 neutropenia and leukopenia were observed in hematological adverse event, but febrile neutropenia was not experienced. She remains well and continues monotherapy of eribulin.

Conclusion

Eribulin exhibited efficacy in a patient with refractory triple negative metastatic breast cancer.

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