Predictive Factors for the Metachronous Development of High-risk Lesions in the Remnant Pancreas After Partial Pancreatectomy for Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm

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Abstract

Objective:

To identify factors predicting the development of high-risk lesions in the remnant pancreas after surgery for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN).

Background:

IPMN has unique features, including multifocality, adenoma-carcinoma sequence, and the development of distinct pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the same pancreas. Careful attention should, therefore, be paid to the metachronous occurrence of high-risk lesions, including high-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma (HGD/INV) of IPMN and concomitant PDAC in the remnant pancreas after partial pancreatectomy for IPMN.

Methods:

Clinicopathologic and surveillance data for 195 patients who underwent partial pancreatectomy for IPMN were reviewed retrospectively.

Results:

Thirteen patients exhibited metachronous development of high-risk lesions including 6 HGD/INV and 7 concomitant PDACs in the remnant pancreas. The 5- and 10-year cumulative incidences of metachronous high-risk lesions in the remnant pancreas were 7.8% and 11.8%, respectively. Twelve of 13 patients had high-risk lesions at the time of initial surgery, and 10 of the 13 IPMNs were located in the distal pancreas. The IPMN subtypes initially resected were gastric in 6 patients, intestinal in 5, and pancreatobililary in the remaining 2. Univariate and multiple regression analyses identified pathologic results of HGD/INV and IPMN located in the distal pancreas as independent predictive factors for metachronous HGD/INV of IPMN, and the pancreatobiliary subtype of IPMN and presence of concomitant PDAC for metachronous PDAC.

Conclusions:

Patients undergoing partial pancreatectomy for IPMN are at high risk of developing lesions requiring surgery in the remnant pancreas, and close, long-term surveillance should be considered in these patients.

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