Mitochondrial dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – a valid pharmacological target?


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective death of upper and lower motor neurons which ultimately leads to paralysis and ultimately death. Pathological changes in ALS are closely associated with pronounced and progressive changes in mitochondrial morphology, bioenergetics and calcium homeostasis. Converging evidence suggests that impaired mitochondrial function could be pivotal in the rapid neurodegeneration of this condition. In this review, we provide an update of recent advances in understanding mitochondrial biology in the pathogenesis of ALS and highlight the therapeutic value of pharmacologically targeting mitochondrial biology to slow disease progression.LINKED ARTICLESThis article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8

    loading  Loading Related Articles