Perianal Crohn's disease


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Abstract

A 13-year-old girl with a history of 4 months of perianal skin lesions is described. Physical examination revealed three 0.5 Ï 1-cm red, swollen, fleshy, skin tags extending from the perianal area to the perineum (Fig. 1). The patient reported intermittent fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain, and her body weight was below the third percentile for her age.Laboratory studies showed an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 101 mm/h; hematocrit of 26%; white blood cell count of 9800/mm3; serum iron of 15 mg/L (normal value (NV), 60-160 mg/L); ferritin of 43.4 μg/L (NV, 12-150 μg/L); transferrin of 203 mg/100 mL (NV, 200-400 mg/100 mL); transferrin saturation of 6% (NV, 20-50%); hypoalbuminemia; negative purified protein derivative (PPD), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL), and antinuclear antibody tests; and Toxoplasma titers of 1/16, Van de Kamer 1.67 g/day. A barium examination revealed marked irregularity of the descending colon, and a colonoscopy showed uneven areas of mucosal edema and pseudopolyps in the transverse and descending colon, associated with irregular thickening and stenosis.Histopathologically, large intestine and skin lesions consisted of noncaseating epithelioid and giant cell granulomas (Fig. 2). Cultures for acid-fast bacilli and fungi were negative, and under polarized light no foreign bodies were seen.Treatment with metronidazole (250 mg three times a day), prednisone (0.5 mg/kg/day), and acetylsalicylic acid (75 mg/kg/day) was moderately effective. Vitamin, folic acid, and iron supplements were also added.

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