Stimulation of the inflammatory system by reamed and unreamed nailing of femoral fractures: AN ANALYSIS OF THE SECOND HIT


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Abstract

It has been suggested that reamed intramedullary nailing of the femur should be avoided in some patients with multiple injuries.We have studied prospectively the effect of femoral reaming on the inflammatory process as implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple-organ failure (MOF). We studied changes in the levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) (proinflammatory cytokine), neutrophil CD11b (C3) receptor expression (activated neutrophil adhesion molecule), serum soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (s-ICAM-1), serum soluble E-selectin (the soluble products of endothelial adhesion molecules) and plasma elastase (neutrophil protease) in a series of patients with femoral fractures treated by nailing. We have also compared reamed nailing with unreamed nailing.We found that the levels of serum IL-6 and elastase rose significantly during the nailing procedure indicating a measurable 'second hit'. There was no clear response in leukocyte activation and no difference in the release of endothelial adhesion molecule markers. There was no significant difference between groups treated by reamed and unreamed nailing. Although clinical unremarkable, the one patient who died from ARDS was shown to be hyperstimulated after injury and again after nailing, suggesting the importance of an excessive inflammatory reaction in the pathogenesis of these serious problems.Our findings have shown that there is a second hit associated with femoral nailing and suggest that the degree of the inflammatory reaction may be important in the pathogenesis of ARDS and MOF.J Bone Joint Surg [Br] 1999;81-B:356-61.

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