Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Secondary to Giant Cell Tumor of the Mobile Spine: A Report of 11 Cases


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Abstract

Study Design.A retrospective analysis was performed.Objective.To analyze the characteristics of aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine and to discuss the outcome of corresponding surgical and nonsurgical treatment.Summary of Background Data.Giant cell tumors are generally benign neoplasms that exhibit aggressive behavior with a tendency to recur locally. Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign, highly vascular osseous lesions. Although both of them have been described separately in previous literatures, few reports have described aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to giant cell tumor of the mobile spine.Methods.Between January 2004 and December 2009, 11 patients were identified with an aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine. Four patients underwent subtotal tumor resection followed by radiotherapy, and the other 7 patients underwent total tumor resection. Patients with lesions located below T6 were treated with selective arterial embolization before surgery. Clinical data and the efficacy of surgery were analyzed via chart reviewResults.Of the eleven patients identified for inclusion in this study, the average age was 33 months (range ∇ 14–65 months). The mean length of follow-up was 31 months. Seven patients kept disease-free during the follow-ups. The remaining four patients recurred and one died of local re-recurrence and lung metastasis.Conclusion.Unlike primary aneurysmal bone cyst, secondary aneurysmal bone cyst arising from giant cell tumor of the mobile spine has a more aggressive tendency to recurrence locally. Complete resection with systematic radiotherapy should be undertaken for the treatment of aneurysmal bone cyst secondary to giant cell tumor of the mobile spine, which is associated with a good prognosis for local tumor control. As complete or as radical an operation as possible should be performed at first presentation. The best chance for the patient is the first chance. Selective preoperative embolization is advised to minimize intraoperative blood loss.

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