THE RELATION OF PREOPERATIVE COAGULATION FINDINGS TO DIAGNOSIS, BLOOD USAGE, AND SURVIVAL IN ADULT LIVER TRANSPLANTATION


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Abstract

A group of 70 adults with end-stage liver disease received 87 homologous liver transplants from 7/11/81 and 7/11/83. The recipients fell into the following diagnostic categories: postnecrotic cirrhosis (PNC) in 22, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in 18, cancer or neoplasia (CA) in 11, sclerosing cholangitis (SC) in 8 and miscellaneous (MISC) in 11. Survival for six months or longer was 46%: survival by group was PBC=67%, CA=55%, PNC=45%, SC=25%, and MISC=18%. Preoperative coagulation profiles were evaluated on 64 of the 70 first transplant patients by assigning a score derived from one point per abnormality in each of 8 tests. Mean coagulation abnormality scores (CAS) were strikingly elevated in the PNC and MISC groups. Mean intraoperative blood product usage was 43 units of RBCs, 40 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), 21 units of platelets, and 9 bags of cryoprecipitate. Direct correlations were found between CAS and RBC usage (+0.454, P=<.001), CAS, and survival of 6 months or longer (-0.281, P=<.02), and RBC usage and survival (-0.408, P=<.001). These findings indicate that the degree of coagulation abnormality and the type of liver disease may be predictive of intraoperative blood usage and survival in liver transplantation in adults.

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