Impact of Continuous EEG Monitoring on Clinical Management in Critically Ill Children


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

BackgroundContinuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring is being used with increasing frequency in critically ill patients, most often to detect non-convulsive seizures. While cEEG is non-invasive and feasible in the critical care setting, it is also expensive and labor intensive, and there has been little study of its impact on clinical care. We aimed to determine prospectively the impact of cEEG on clinical management in critically ill children.MethodsCritically ill children (non-neonates) with acute encephalopathy underwent cEEG. Study enrollment and data collection were prospective.Results100 children were studied. EEG monitoring led to specific clinical management changes in 59 children. These included initiating or escalating anti-seizure medications in 43 due to seizure detection, demonstrating that a specific event (subtle movement or vital sign change) was not a seizure in 21, or obtaining urgent neuroimaging that led to a clinical change in 3. In the remaining 41 children, cEEG ruled out the presence of non-convulsive seizures but did not lead to a specific change in clinical management.ConclusionsEEG monitoring led to changes in clinical management in the majority of patients, suggesting it may have an important role in management of critically ill children. Further study is needed to determine whether the management changes elicited by cEEG improve outcome.

    loading  Loading Related Articles