The Effects of Propofol, Isoflurane, and Sevoflurane on Oxygenation and Shunt Fraction During One-Lung Ventilation

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Propofol's effect on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction during one-lung ventilation (OLV) has not been determined. Twenty patients who had long-term OLV for esophageal surgery were allocated randomly to one of two study groups; one in which isoflurane administration preceded propofol, and another in which sevoflurane administration preceded propofol. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples and hemodynamics were measured as follows: before OLV, during OLV, OLV at 4 cm of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), OLV after conversion from volatile anesthetics to propofol, OLV at 4 cm of PEEP, and after OLV. After the application of 4 cm of PEEP during propofol anesthesia, PaO2 increased significantly in both groups. The shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) increased significantly after the initiation of OLV in both groups and decreased significantly after the conversion from volatile anesthetics to propofol in both groups. Propofol can be used safely during OLV because PaO2 increased after the application of 4 cm of PEEP during propofol anesthesia, and Qs/Qt decreased significantly after the conversion from inhaled anesthetics to propofol anesthesia. Implications: During one-lung ventilation, the arterial partial pressure of oxygen values with propofol were greater than those with isoflurane and sevoflurane, and shunt fraction values with propofol were lower than those with both volatile anesthetics. Propofol improved oxygenation and shunt fraction during one-lung ventilation compared with volatile anesthetics.

(Anesth Analg 1998;87:1164-9)

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles