Treatment for Hearing Loss among the Elderly: Auditory Outcomes and Impact on Quality of Life


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Abstract

The study aim was to determine the benefit of cochlear implantation and hearing aids in older adults diagnosed with hearing loss and to evaluate the index of depression, anxiety and quality of life after such treatments. A retrospective cohort comprised 117 patients older than 65 years and diagnosed with moderate to profound hearing loss who were included and classified into 2 groups (treated vs. non-treated). A battery of tests including auditory (pure-tone average, disyllabic words in quiet at 65 dB SPL) and findings from a series of questions relevant to quality of life were compared between both groups. Auditory outcomes for disyllabic words were 58.21% for the cochlear implant-treated group and 82.8% for the hearing aid-treated group. There was a positive effect on anxiety, depression, health status and quality of life in the cochlear implant group versus the profound hearing loss control group. We conclude that older adults with moderate to profound hearing loss gain benefit from hearing aids or cochlear implants not only in terms of improved hearing function, but also in terms of positive effects on anxiety, depression, health status and quality of life.

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