Effects of ropivacaine on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A prospective, randomized study

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Abstract

Postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is an ongoing problem. To relieve this pain, practitioners have used many anesthetic and analgesic drugs. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of incisional and intraperitoneal administration of ropivacaine on postoperative pain and stress response in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In this prospective, singleblinded, randomized study, 45 patients with ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) scores I and II who were about to undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy were divided into 3 groups. After cholecystectomy, a total of 40 mL of 3.75% ropivacaine was administered preincisionally and intraperitoneally to patients in group 1 (n=14); preincisionally and intraperitoneally to patients in group 2 (n=17); and intraperitoneally and locally at incision sites to patients in group 3 (n=14). Blood levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were examined preoperatively, 15 min after insufflation, and at the end of the operation. Visual analog pain scale scores and analgesic requirements were used for 24-h postoperative follow-up of pain levels reported by patients. No statistically significant difference was found among the 3 groups with respect to visual analog pain scale scores, total analgesic requirements, and accompanying pain, nausea, and vomiting. The earliest analgesic requirements were seen in group 2 (P < .005), and less shoulder pain was noted in group 3 (P < .005). Norepinephrine and epinephrine levels showed no statistically significant differences between the 3 groups. Administration of ropivacaine preoperatively and postoperatively for laparoscopic cholecystectomy has similar effects on postoperative pain and the stress response of patients.

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