Short-term intermittent intravenous clodronate in the prevention of bone loss related to chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure


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Abstract

SummaryChemotherapy-induced ovarian failure causes rapid bone loss in premenopausal women with early breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of intravenous intermittent clodronate during adjuvant chemotherapy in prevention of this rapid bone loss. 45 premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. In addition, all women were randomly allocated to receive either seven cycles of intravenous clodronate infusions (1500 mg each) parallel to the chemotherapy or no further therapy. The mean bone loss in the lumbar spine at 6 months was −0.5% in the clodronate group and −1.4% in the control group (p = 0.22) and, at 12 months, −3.9% and −3.6%, respectively (p = 0.62). Type I collagen metabolite PINP levels at six months were significantly lower in the clodronate group than in the control group: 22.6 μg/l (range 15.7-55.8 μg/l) and 44.0 μg/l (range 12.5-91.9 μg/l), respectively (p = 0.0001). At 12 months, no difference between the PINP levels in clodronate and control groups were seen. In conclusion, in this small study a short-term intermittent intravenous clodronate treatment did not seem to prevent clinically significantly the bone loss related to chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure in premenopausal women with early stage breast cancer, even though a significant reduction of a biochemical marker of bone turnover (PINP) was seen during the therapy.

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