Influence of intracerebroventricular administration of cannabinergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory in the step-down passive avoidance test


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Abstract

The effects of cannabinergic drugs on morphine state-dependent memory of passive avoidance task were examined in mice. Pre-training (0.25, 0.5 and 5 mg/kg) and post-training (5 mg/kg) administration of morphine impaired memory retrieval on the test day. Impairment of memory retrieval by morphine (5 mg/kg) on the test day was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of the opioid. The pre-test intracerebroventricular administration of the cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptor agonist (WIN55,212-2) (0.75 and 1 μg/mouse) not only mimicked the effect of pre-test morphine treatment, but also increased this action of the opioid. Furthermore, the pre-test intracerebroventricular administration of CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251) (20 and 100 ng/mouse) prevented the restoration of memory by morphine. Pre-training administration of WIN55,212-2 (1 μg/mouse) led to state-dependent learning with impaired memory retrieval on the test day as well, which was reversed by pre-test administration of the drug (0.5, 0.75 and 1 μg/mouse) or morphine (1 and 5 mg/kg). Restoration of impairment induced by WIN55,212-2 was decreased by both the opioid receptor antagonists, naloxone (0.01 μg/mouse) and AM251 (20 and 100 ng/mouse). In conclusion, the improvement of memory retrieval by morphine treatment on the test day seems to be induced, at least in part, by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

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