Potentially modifiable risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with psoriasis

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Abstract

Background

Data on pregnancy outcomes among women with psoriasis are lacking. However, there are several known comorbidities of psoriasis, including obesity, smoking and depression, each of which increases the risk for negative birth outcomes.

Objectives

To determine if pregnant women with psoriasis have an excess of potentially modifiable risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Methods

Prospectively collected data from the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS) Autoimmune Diseases in Pregnancy Project were analysed to compare the prevalence of selected risk factors between 170 pregnant women with psoriasis and 158 nondiseased controls.

Results

Women with psoriasis were more likely to be overweight/obese prior to pregnancy (P < 0·0001), to smoke (P < 0·0001), or to have a diagnosis of depression (P = 0·03), and were less likely to have been taking preconceptional vitamin supplements (P = 0·004). After controlling for race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status, women with psoriasis were 2·37 (95% confidence interval 1·45–3·87) times more likely to be overweight/obese as women without psoriasis. Duration of disease, age at onset, measures of disease impact during pregnancy, or use of biologics in pregnancy were not significant predictors of overweight/obesity in the subset of psoriatic women.

Conclusions

Pregnant women with psoriasis may be at increased risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes due to comorbidities or other health behaviours associated with the disease. These should be taken into consideration during clinical treatment of women with psoriasis who are in their childbearing years.

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