Influence of chronic administration of anabolic androgenic steroids and taurine on haemostasis profile in rats: a thrombelastographic study

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Abstract

Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone with thrombogenic potential in high doses and long-term administration. Taurine, a widely distributed amino-sulfonic acid, is known for its beneficial effects in hypercoagulable states. In order to assess the impact of chronic administration of high doses of AAS and taurine upon haemostasis process in rats, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: control group (group C) – no treatment; androgen group (group A) – received 10 mg/kg per week of nandrolone decanoate (DECA); taurine (group T) – received oral supplementation of 2% taurine in drinking water; androgen and taurine group (group AT) – concomitant administration of DECA and taurine. After 12 weeks, blood samples were collected and haemostasis parameters were assessed with the thrombelastographic (TEG) analysis system: reaction time, clot kinetics (K, α), final clot strength, coagulation index and the clot lysis (Ly30). Nandrolone significantly decreased reaction time in group A compared with control (P < 0.001), whereas taurine significantly increase reaction time (P = 0.01), and this effect was maintained in group AT compared with group A (P = 0.009). Similar differences between groups have been recorded for the clot kinetics parameters K, α. The final clot strength and coagulation index were significantly increased in group A versus group C (P = 0.04, respectively P < 0.001), but not in group AT versus group C (P > 0.05). There were no differences in clot lysis, as shown by Ly30. Nandrolone produces an accelerated clot development and an increased clot firmness in Wistar rats. Taurine association ensures a protective effect against this hypercoagulable state, partially restoring the altered parameters of the coagulation profile.

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