Incidence and clinical significance of hyperfibrinolysis during living donor liver transplantation

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Abstract

We evaluated the incidence and clinical significance of hyperfibrinolysis during living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using viscoelastic coagulation tests. We retrospectively reviewed adult LDLT recipients from February 2010 to February 2015. Hyperfibrinolysis was defined when clot lysis index [LY60 = (MA − A60)/MA × 100, %] was less than 85, where A60 is the clot amplitude at 60 min after maximum amplitude (MA) occurred. Viscoelastic coagulation tests were performed six times (T1: immediately after anesthetic induction, T2: end of preanhepatic phase, T3: 1 h after anhepatic phase, T4: 5 min after reperfusion, T5: 1 h after reperfusion, and T6: 3 h after reperfusion). One hundred-ten recipients were included in final analysis. Hyperfibrinolysis was uncommon in preanhepatic phase (0% at T1 and 4.5% at T2) and aggravated during anhepatic phase and peaked immediately after reperfusion, 18% at T3 and 71% at T4. However, hyperfibrinolysis nearly disappeared 1 h after reperfusion and did not recur; 0.9% at T5 and 0% at T6. Hyperfibrinolysis was not predicted from preoperative demographics and coagulation profiles. However, the degree of coagulation profile derangements and intraoperative blood loss was greater in the hyperfibrinolysis group. During LDLT, hyperfibrionlysis frequently occurred at anhepatic phase and immediately after reperfusion, but it was resolved during postreperfusion phase.

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