Association of systolic blood pressure levels with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and all-cause mortality: a result from the Kailuan study

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Abstract

Objective

We aimed to examine the impact of different levels of systolic blood pressure (SBP) on the incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and all-cause death in Chinese adults.

Patients and methods

A total of 97 013 Chinese men and women from the Kailuan study were followed up with the incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and all-cause death. The participants were categorized into nine groups on the basis of the different SBP levels (mmHg) (groups 1–9): SBP<110, 110≤SBP<120, 120≤SBP<130, 130≤SBP<140, 140≤SBP<150, 150≤SBP<160, 160≤SBP<170, 170≤SBP<180, and SBP≥180. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from Cox regression models.

Results

During a mean follow-up of 4.02 years, a total of 2043 cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and 1686 of all-cause deaths occurred. After adjustments for potential confounding factors and using group 1 as a reference, HRs (95% CIs) of total cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events for groups 2–9 were 1.35 (1.00–1.82), 1.61 (1.22–2.12), 1.54 (1.16–2.04), 2.05 (1.55–2.72), 2.47 (1.86–3.29), 3.04 (2.28–4.06), 3.93 (2.89–5.36), and 4.56 (3.39–6.15), respectively. HRs (95% CIs) of all-cause death for groups 2–9 were 0.92 (0.71–1.20), 0.95 (0.75–1.20), 1.06 (0.83–1.34), 1.18 (0.93–1.50), 1.16 (0.90–1.49), 1.39 (1.07–1.81), 1.74 (1.29–2.33), and 2.06 (1.56–2.72), respectively.

Conclusion

An increase in the SBP levels is significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and all-cause death.

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