Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and incidence of inflammatory bowel disease among patients with type 2 diabetes: population based cohort study

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess whether the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors is associated with the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

DESIGN

Population based cohort study.

SETTING

More than 700 general practices contributing data to the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink.

PARTICIPANTS

A cohort of 141 170 patients, at least 18 years of age, starting antidiabetic drugs between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2016, with follow-up until 30 June 2017.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Adjusted hazard ratios for incident inflammatory bowel disease associated with use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors overall, by cumulative duration of use, and by time since initiation, estimated using time dependent Cox proportional hazards models. Use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors was modelled as a time varying variable and compared with use of other antidiabetic drugs, with exposures lagged by six months to account for latency and diagnostic delays.

RESULTS

During 552 413 person years of follow-up, 208 incident inflammatory bowel disease events occurred (crude incidence rate of 37.7 (95% confidence interval 32.7 to 43.1) per 100 000 person years). Overall, use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors was associated with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease (53.4 v 34.5 per 100 000 person years; hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.49). Hazard ratios gradually increased with longer durations of use, reaching a peak after three to four years of use (hazard ratio 2.90, 1.31 to 6.41) and decreasing after more than four years of use (1.45, 0.44 to 4.76). A similar pattern was observed with time since starting dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. These findings remained consistent in several sensitivity analyses.

CONCLUSIONS

In this first population based study, the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors was associated with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Although these findings need to be replicated, physicians should be aware of this possible association.

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