Acetabular Reconstruction with Impaction Bone-Grafting and a Cemented Cup in Patients Younger than Fifty Years Old: A Concise Follow-up, at Twenty to Twenty-eight Years, of a Previous Report*


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Abstract

In a previous report, we presented our results of forty-two acetabular reconstructions, performed with use of impaction bone-grafting and a cemented polyethylene cup, in thirty-seven patients who were younger than fifty years and had a minimum of fifteen years of follow-up. The present update study shows the results after twenty to twenty-eight years. Eight additional cups had to be revised—four because of aseptic loosening, three because of wear, and one during a revision of the stem. Three additional cups were considered loose on radiographs. Survivorship of the acetabular reconstructions, with an end point of revision for any reason, was 73% after twenty years and 52% after twenty-five years. With revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survival was 85% after twenty years and 77% after twenty-five years; for signs of loosening on radiographs, survival was 71% at twenty years and 62% at twenty-five years. In conclusion, our previous results have declined but the technique of using impacted morselized bone graft and a cemented cup is useful for the purpose of restoring bone stock in young patients whose acetabular defects require primary or revision total hip arthroplasty.Level of Evidence:Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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