Alterations of EEG rhythms during motor preparation following awake brain surgery

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Slow-growing, infiltrative brain tumours may modify the electrophysiological balance between the two hemispheres. To determine whether and how asymmetry of EEG rhythms during motor preparation might occur following “awake brain surgery” for this type of tumour, we recorded electroencephalograms during a simple visuo-manual reaction time paradigm performed by the patients between 3 and 12months after surgery and compared them to a control group of 8 healthy subjects. Frequency analyses revealed imbalances between the injured and healthy hemispheres. More particularly, we observed a power increase in the δ frequency band near the lesion site and a power increase in the α and β frequency bands. Interestingly, these alterations seem to decrease for the two patients whose surgery were anterior to 9months, independently of the size of the lesion. Reaction times did not reflect this pattern as they were clearly not inversely related to the anteriority of the surgery. Electrophysiology suggests here different processes of recovery compared to behavioral data and brings further insights for the understanding of EEG rhythms that should not be systematically confounded or assimilated with cognitive performances. EEG monitoring is rare for these patients, especially after awake brain surgery, however it is important.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles