Intermediate and Long-term Outcomes of Giant Fibroadenoma Excision in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

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Abstract

Giant fibroadenomas (5 cm or greater) are benign breast masses that often present in adolescence and require surgical excision. Long-term outcomes, recurrence rates, and the need for additional reconstructive surgery in this population are unknown. Patients aged 11–25 years whose pathology reports indicated the presence of a giant fibroadenoma were eligible for this study. Medical records were reviewed for presentation, treatment, and outcomes. A subset of patients completed an investigator-designed long-term outcome survey to measure additional outcomes and the desire or need for subsequent reconstructive surgery. Forty-six patients with at least one giant fibroadenoma (mean size 7.4 ± 2.8 cm) were identified. Most patients underwent excision with a periaroeolar incision (n = 31), and an enucleation technique (n = 41), and four patients underwent immediate breast reconstruction. Thirty-three patients had complete medical records with a mean follow-up time of 2.2 ± 4.1 years and no complaints of asymmetry, additional breast deformities, or reconstructive surgery procedures documented. In addition, nine patients completed the investigator-designed survey with a mean follow-up time of 10.1 ± 8.7 years (range 1.5–27.0). Three of these patients reported postoperative breast asymmetry and the desire to pursue reconstructive surgery. Aesthetic outcomes of giant fibroadenoma excision may be satisfactory for many patients without immediate reconstruction, but for others, the need for reconstructive surgery may arise during development. Providers should address this potential need prior to discussing treatment options and during postoperative follow-up. Caution should be exercised before recommending immediate reconstruction.

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