Brain Amyloid Deposition Is Associated With Lower Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Abilities in Older Adults. Results From the MAPT Study

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Abstract

Background.

Brain amyloid deposition is one of the key pathological hallmarks underlying the cognitive changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Growing interest has been given to the earliest clinical manifestations of amyloid plaques. However, the relationship between amyloid status and activities of everyday function remains largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the relationship between instrumental activities of daily living performance (using the ADL-PI score) and amyloid status in older adults.

Methods.

Cross-sectional analyses of data from the Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial (MAPT) were performed. Volunteers underwent a brain 18F-AV45 positron emission tomography examination. Bivariate analysis and regression models were conducted to study the relationships between brain amyloid deposition and the total ADL-PI score.

Results.

We included 271 participants (women = 60%; age = 76±4 years). Amyloid positron emission tomography was positive (standard uptake value ≥1.17) for 103 participants (38%). The ADL-PI score was lower in amyloid positive participants than in their amyloid negative counterparts (38.8 vs 40.3, p = .007). This association was also confirmed in regression models adjusted for age, gender, and familial history of Alzheimer’s disease (odds ratio = 0.94; 95% confidence interval 0.89–0.99; p = .02). This finding was consistent in cognitively normal individuals and in those with mild cognitive impairment, using the clinical dementia rating scale.

Conclusions.

This study highlighted an association between early functional limitations and brain amyloid deposition in elderly subjects. These symptoms could be the clinical manifestations of amyloid plaques even in the absence of overt dementia. Further prospective studies are warranted for examining the evolution of ADL-PI score over the course of Alzheimer’s disease.

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