Risk Factors for Ophthalmic Complications in Patients With Burns


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Abstract

A retrospective study of patients admitted to MetroHealth Medical Center was performed to identify the risk factors for short- and long-term ophthalmologic complications related to burn injury. From 2000 to 2007, the authors identified 293 patients with the inclusion criteria of facial burns, TBSA ≥20%, or smoke inhalation injury. Seventy (24%) developed ocular complications, and 16 (11%) developed long-term complications. Statistically significant risk factors identified for short-term complications were burn size, chemical burns, depth of facial burns, initial Glasgow Coma Scale, and need for mechanical ventilation/sedation. Risk factors for long-term complications included wound infection with Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter, third-degree burn size, hours to ophthalmology evaluation, LOS, time on mechanical ventilation, and need for STSG. In addition to facial burns, the requirement of mechanical ventilation, prolonged sedation, and presence of infection with Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter increase the risk of injury to the eye after burn injury, and these patients may benefit from serial eye examinations for early identification of ocular complications.

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